Daily Archives: August 29, 2017

We recently had a request from client who is a condominium owner to proceed with an eviction because their tenant was not only failing to pay them rent, but they also had listed the condominium for rent on the Airbnb website.

The question they asked was: Can a tenant rent out their unit through a sharing site like Airbnb? In their case, the answer was no.

Airbnb is short term subletting. Section 97 of the Residential Tenancies Act states that a tenant must obtain consent from the landlord in order to sublet the unit.

Subletting without the consent of the landlord infringes on a landlord’s rights under Section 64 of the Act, and is grounds for eviction.

Even if the landlord consents to this type of subletting, which they should not, the issue of using the unit as an Airbnb may still not be permitted. Section 134(3) of the Act does not allow a tenant to sublet their unit for an amount greater than the rent paid to the landlord. If you are paying $3,000.00 a month in rent to your landlord, and your potential income over the month is more than $3,000.00, then you have breached the Act, and this is grounds for eviction. This section does not allow you collect any fees, penalties, or key deposits from an Airbnb guest.

If the rental unit is a condominium, not only are there issues to deal with under the Act, but Condominium Corporations have its own declarations or bylaws, and most forbid short-term tenancies like Airbnb. The shortest tenancy usually allowed (and most recently upheld in Court) is four months. This is mainly due to these short-term tenants using the amenities of the building, which they are not permitted to use, and for the potential disregard by those guests for the property, and most importantly for security reasons.

Tenants will also have to pay for any damages to the unit as to the landlord as a result of the Airbnb guests. The problem for the tenant is not having enough information on these guests to pursue them for legal action to recover those costs. In addition, the landlord who is the owner of the condominium may face fines imposed by the Condominium Board for any damages caused by the Airbnb guests to the common elements of the building.

If you are a condominium owner and you want to use your unit as an Airbnb, first check the Condominium’s Declaration to ensure you can, and also make sure you also confirm with your insurer that you are covered. If damages to your unit are caused by your Airbnb guests, you may not be covered under your policy.

Murray Brown, Paralegal
mbrown@andriessen.ca